Popes and their associates

Popes and their associates

Antonio Barberini (1607–1671) – one of the three “musketeers” of Urban VIII

Popes and their associates

Camillo Francesco Maria Pamphilj (1622–1666) – an arthritis-filled expiation of the papal nephew

Popes and their associates

Ferdinando I de’ Medici (1549–1609) – a lover of antiquity, who avoided papal disfavor

Popes and their associates

Francesco Barberini (1597–1679) – papal nepot, admirer of books and art, defender of Galileo

Popes and their associates

Francesco Maria del Monte (1549–1626) – a cardinal full of passion for alchemy, music and painting

Popes and their associates

Cardinal Bessarion (1403?–1473) – the one who wanted to save Constantinople

Popes and their associates

Cardinal Flavio Chigi (1631–1693) – a true dandy and a Roman trendsetter

Popes and their associates

Cardinal Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte (1532–1577) – the pope’s favorite with criminal inclinations

Popes and their associates

Cardinal Paolo Camillo Sfondrati (1560–1618) – chasing sainthood

Popes and their associates

Charles Borromeo (1538–1584) – an extraordinary nepot, critic and saint of the Church

Popes and their associates

Ludovico Ludovisi (1595–1632) – lover of Antiquity and an extremely bright papal nepot

Popes and their associates

Maria Clementina Sobieska (1701–1735) between reality and a dream

Popes and their associates

Olimpia Maidalchini (1591–1657) – a very entrepreneurial papal sister-in-law

Popes and their associates

Pope Alexander I (? – 116?) – a holy shepherd of the holy water

Popes and their associates

Pope Alexander VI (1431–1503) – an ambitious strategist with a great heart for women

Popes and their associates

Pope Alexander VII (1599–1667) – a great constructor with a lead coffin in his bedroom

Popes and their associates

Pope Alexander VIII (1610–1691), Pietro Vito Ottoboni – a profligate enthusiast of old books

Popes and their associates

Pope Boniface VIII (1235?–1303), Benedetto Caetani – pope from the eighth circle of hell

Popes and their associates

Pope Celestine I (?–432) – philosopher striving for the divinity of the mother of Jesus

Popes and their associates

Pope Damasus I (approx. 305–384) – the one who changed the face of the Roman Church forever

Popes and their associates

Pope Felix III (Felix II) (?–492) – a saintly, uncompromising and strict pope

Popes and their associates

Pope Formosus (?816–896) – meaning, how to posthumously become a martyr

Popes and their associates

Pope Gelasius I (?–496) – meaning Christ’s first Vicar on Earth

Popes and their associates

Pope Gregory I the Great (approx. 540–604) – a monk by conviction, who changed the face of the Church for centuries

Popes and their associates

Pope Gregory XIII (1502–1585) – a tireless counter-reformer and an efficient reformer of the calendar

Popes and their associates

Pope Gregory XIV (1535–1591) – pious, modest, and lacking in will

Popes and their associates

Pope Gregory XV (1554–1623) – a sickly and phlegmatic protector of the Jesuits

Popes and their associates

Pope Hilarius (?–468) – a generous donor and a defender of orthodoxy

Popes and their associates

Pope Hippolytus (approx. 170–235) – an overzealous saintly rigorist

Popes and their associates

Pope Honorius I (?–638), a fallible pontifex maximus, in addition to being a heretic

Popes and their associates

Pope Honorius III (1150–1227) – a significant Church strategist and an uncompromising ruler

Popes and their associates

Pope Innocent I (? – 417) – a charismatic leader of the Church in times of chaos and uncertainty

Popes and their associates

Pope Innocent III (1160–1216) – the first Vicar of Christ on Earth

Popes and their associates

Pope Innocent VIII (1432–1492) – sickly, yet resourceful protector of his own children

Popes and their associates

Pope Innocent XI (1611–1689) – a strict reformer, moralist and subduer of art

Popes and their associates

Pope Innocent XII (1615–1700) – an exemplary shepherd and a protector of castrates

Popes and their associates

Pope John XII (?937–964) – meaning the one who was mortally wounded by the devil in the bed of a married woman

Popes and their associates

Pope Julius II (1443–1513) – a valiant ruler, courageous politician and a great protector of art

Popes and their associates

Pope Julius III (1487–1555) – a dream about the power of ...a family

Popes and their associates

Pope Callixtus III (1378–1458) – a disliked aesthetic from the Pyrenean Peninsula

Popes and their associates

Pope Clement IX (1600–1669) – a librettist and humanist devoted to God

Popes and their associates

Pope Clement VII (1478–1534) – a powerless politician and a firm protector of artists

Popes and their associates

Pope Clement VIII (1536–1605) – an enemy of nudity, a pious and kind despot

Popes and their associates

Pope Clement X (1590–1676) – a humble pope with an ambitious nepot

Popes and their associates

Pope Leo I the Great (400?–461) – defender of Rome and the man behind the power of the Church

Popes and their associates

Pope Leo X (1475–1521) – a generous patron of art and an enthusiast of parties and feasts

Popes and their associates

Pope Nicholas V (1397–1455) – the one, who made art into a foundation of faith

Popes and their associates

Pope Paschal I (?–824) – a collector of relics and a self-admirer

Popes and their associates

Pope Paul II (1417–1471) – an enthusiast of carnival parties

Popes and their associates

Pope Paul III (1468–1549) – an uncompromising patron of artists and his own family

Popes and their associates

Pope Paul V (1552–1621) – a generous funder and a foresighted city manager

Popes and their associates

Pope Pelagius II (?–590) – a protector of the needy and of Gregory the Great

Popes and their associates

Pope Pius II (1405–1464) – a complete humanist on St. Peter’s throne

Popes and their associates

Pope Pius XII (1876–1958) – a silent pontifex maximus

Popes and their associates

Pope Sergius III (approx. 870–911) – meaning „ the slave of every vice”

Popes and their associates

Pope Stephen VI (? – 897) – a story of the battle between the pope and a cadaver

Popes and their associates

Pope Sixtus III (390–440) – a great constructor of Christian Rome

Popes and their associates

Pope Sixtus IV (1414–1484) – a man of Renaissance and the creator of a new Rome

Popes and their associates

Pope Sixtus V (1521–1590) – the bane of bandits and womanizers

Popes and their associates

Pope Sylvester (? -335) – a marginal figure, yet a saint

Popes and their associates

Pope Symmachus (? – 514) – a controversial but unrelenting shepherd

Popes and their associates

Pope Simplicius (? – 483) – a bishop of Rome on the border of two eras

Popes and their associates

Pope Theodore I (?–649) – a pope who brought the dead to Rome

Popes and their associates

Pope Urban I (? – 230) – the beginning of the historical policy of the Church

Popes and their associates

Pope Urban VIII (1568–1644) – pontifex maximus of the Baroque art

Popes and their associates

Platina (Bartolomeo Sacchi) (1421–1481) – humanist, rebel, courtier

Popes and their associates

Scipione Caffarelli Borghese (1577–1633) – cardinal and papal nepot with truly earthly passions

Giovanni Baglioni’s Heavenly Love and Earthly Love – a virtue in the struggle against sin

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Giovanni Baglioni’s Heavenly Love and Earthly Love – a virtue in the struggle against sin

These were the best of times when art was talked about without end. Times when the composition, color scheme, but especially the mysterious, ambiguous message of a painting was something to get excited about. A painting became an object of intellectual disputes and a true stimulus for spiritual pleasures. This was noticed by art patrons and collectors from the beginning of the Seicento period – a time of increased interest in works dedicated to private contemplation.  And they had a lot to choose from since at that time Rome became home to thousands of artists coming into the city f...

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Artemisia Gentileschi’s Saint Cecilia Playing the Lute – an autoportrait in the guise of a saint

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Artemisia Gentileschi’s Saint Cecilia Playing the Lute – an autoportrait in the guise of a saint

A young woman in a beautiful dress is playing the lute, looking up, as if she was searching for inspiration. She could be one of the courtiers at the duke’s court making the time more enjoyable for both residents and guests, and if it had not been for the title of the painting we would not have thought that it depicts a saint. The artwork was painted by Artemisia Gentileschi “the only woman in Italy”, who had ever known what painting, color, impasto, and similar things mean”. This is what was claimed by the great expert of Baroque art, Roberto Longhi in his essay from 1...

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Gerrit (Gerard) van Honthorst (1590–1656) – a restrained nocturnal painter

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Gerrit (Gerard) van Honthorst (1590–1656) – a restrained nocturnal painter

The turn of the XVI and XVII centuries in the Netherlands was a period of social unrest and religious struggles. In Utrecht, ruled by the Protestant, yet liberal elite, the artist was part of the Catholic minority. He learned his trade at the workshop of the famous Abraham Bloemaert. From among the forty-eight painters active in Utrecht at that time, twenty-five went to Italy. Van Honthorst did likewise. During several years he obtained valuable commissions for large-format works designated for churches and captured the minds and hearts of private collectors. His rapid career was a shock, even...

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