Roman districts

Roman districts

Aventine Hill – a place of peace, harmony and spiritual enrichment

Roman districts

Campo de’Fiori – a field full of flowers, bloodbaths, and market stalls

Roman districts

Città Universitaria – the pride of Fascists: between academic monumentalism and rationalism

Roman districts

Foro Italico – an enclave of the cult of Mussolini and his empire

Roman districts

Forum of Augustus (Forum Augustum) – a complex in his own honor and that of religion

Roman districts

Forum Boarium – an ancient place of trade and cult

Roman districts

Forum of Caesar (Forum Iulium) – discreet ambitions of a dictator, meaning a square in his own honor

Roman districts

Forum of Nerva – an unfinished work of a condemned emperor

Roman districts

Catacombs of St. Agnes – burial in the shadow of a famous martyr

Roman districts

Small Aventine – in search of ancient and early Christian Rome

Roman districts

Piazza del Popolo – the calling card of the city: a prestigious, elegant and representative location

Roman districts

Piazza della Madonna dei Monti – a place not for tourists, picturesque and lively

Roman districts

Piazza della Rotonda – the tribulation of popes, a square cleaned for centuries

Roman districts

Piazza di San Pietro – an ingenious idea of two visionaries

Roman districts

Piazza Navona – from a stadium to a representative salon of the pope

Roman districts

Piazza Venezia – the vibrant heart of Rome

Roman districts

Via dei Fori Imperiali – an axis with political and ideological roots

Roman districts

Via della Conciliazione – a road to reconciliation, and at the same time the beginning of a new era for the Church

Roman districts

Villa Aldobrandini – a place of respite over the city teeming with life

Saint Jerome (between 331 and 347 – 420) – „Romans hide your daughters because Jerome is coming”

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Saint Jerome (between 331 and 347 – 420) – „Romans hide your daughters because Jerome is coming”

We are familiar with this interpreter of the Bible mainly from images showing his old, rachitic body. However, behind the official façade of a hermit and erudite hides a man prone to conflicts and uncompromising, whose figure is willingly (today) recalled by those who, on one hand, want to show his misogyny, and on the other those who would like to prove that his attitude is the best evidence of valuing women in the late-antiquity Church. And where was the actual truth?

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Polet Chapel – a monument to the counter-reformation virtues of a French wine merchant

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Polet Chapel – a monument to the counter-reformation virtues of a French wine merchant

The Roman career of  Domenichino was hanging by a thread. First the death of Pope Clement VIII, whose nepot (Pietro Aldobrandini) was the artist’s patron, and then the death of his master Annibale Carracci (1609) meant that commissions no longer came. And only on the eve of his departure for Bologna, the painter obtained a very prestigious commission, namely the painting of The Last Communion of St Jerome, to be quickly followed by a series of frescoes concerning the life of St. Cecilia. These frescoes were ordered by a wealthy merchant as an element of the decoration of the Roman F...

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Domenichino’s The Last Communion of St. Jerome – a work about the superiority of communion under one kind

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Domenichino’s The Last Communion of St. Jerome – a work about the superiority of communion under one kind

When in 1614 this painting was hung at the main altar of the Church of San Girolamo della Carità at via Monserrato, it aroused such a great admiration, that the inhabitants of Rome went on veritable pilgrimages to visit it, praising its religious depth, power of expression, and realism. The work as well as its creator – Domenichino, were the talk of the entire artistic world. Only one man looked upon them with skepticism and jealousy. This was, the well-known in the city on the Tiber painter Lanfranco. A few years later he accused Domenichino of plagiarism, desiring to cover him i...

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