Emperors, leaders and dictators

Dictators and leaders

Aetius (390–454) – the tragic end of „the last Roman”

Dictators and leaders

Alberic II (909? – 954) – an annihilator of his own mother and a prince of Rome

Roman emperors and their associates

Antinous (approx. 110–130 A.D.) – a youth, for whom the emperor lost his mind

Dictators and leaders

Benito Mussolini (1883–1945) – successor of emperors; a charismatic and adored leader

Dictators and leaders

Cesare Borgia (1476–1507) – papal offspring whom the whole world feared

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Antoninus Pius (86–161) – a god-fearing, reasonable and just host

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Domitian (51–96) - a great constructor and a despot hated by the Senate

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Hadrian (76–138) – a traveler and an admirer of Greek culture

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Honorius (384–423) – the one, who allowed Rome to be plundered

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Caracalla (188–217) – a brutal madman or a victim of propaganda?

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Commodus (161–192) – an unfortunate son of a great father

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Marcus Aurelius (121–180)– a philosopher on the imperial throne

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Nerva (30–98) – a reasonable, gentle and wise emperor

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Septimius Severus (145–211) – the one, who made the army into a leading force in the empire

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Theodosius the Great (347–395) – the one, who turned imperium Romanum into imperium Christianum

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Trajan (53–117) – the ideal Roman ruler – courageous, generous and on good terms with the Senate

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Titus (39–81) – the conqueror of Jerusalem and lover of Berenice

Roman emperors and their associates

Emperor Velentinian III (419–455) – the pathetic mutiny of a marginalized ruler

Roman emperors and their associates

Empress Domitia Longina (53?–128?) – respected and condemned, the fate of the wife of the last Flavian

Roman emperors and their associates

Helena – from an innkeeper to a saint, meaning how legends are made

Roman emperors and their associates

Empress Julia Domna (150/160? – 217) – an ambitious ruler and an unhappy mother

Roman emperors and their associates

Galla Placidia (390–450) – an exceptional woman, worth as much as several tons of grain

Roman emperors and their associates

Honoria (418–455?) – an emancipator or a tool of political calculations?

Roman emperors and their associates

Constantina – an imperial daughter and an enigmatic saint

Dictators and leaders

Odoacer (433–493) – the fall of the empire, meaning how an intelligent illiterate became a Roman king

Roman emperors and their associates

Romulus Augustulus (approx. 463–ok. 536) – the last emperor of the Western Empire and….nothing more

Dictators and leaders

Theodoric the Great (441–526) – a barbarian, for whom Romans erected monuments

House of Savoy and contemporary leaders

Victor Emanuel III (1869–1947) – a king rejected and unwanted

The Deliverance of St. Peter– between reality and a vision

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The Deliverance of St. Peter– between reality and a vision

Here in front of our very eyes, a mysterious scene takes place, written down in the Gospel of St. Luke. We are in Jerusalem. Christ had been crucified a few years prior. The ruler of Judea, King Herod Agrippa I, had already for some time been wanting to appeal to the Jews and persecutes a sect of Christians (Jews believing in Christ). He orders one of Jesus’s companions – James to be executed and has Peter imprisoned. Why him? It seemed that Peter was the leader of the new religious movement. Locked in prison and guarded by four regiments (four soldiers in each) after the Passover...

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Fontana di Piazza Mastai – an old or a new fountain, here is the question

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Fontana di Piazza Mastai – an old or a new fountain, here is the question

Walking along the streets of Trastevere, if we sit weary from our trip, on one of the stony benches on the Mastai Square, our eyes will be faced with quite a challenge. Although, we can feel that the fancy fountain, which we have in front of us is not old, similarly to the square itself, it looks like a centuries-old structure in every inch. If this ignorance would make us feel uneasy, it is simply enough to read the inscription found on one of its walls. We can have no doubt – the fountain was not created until 1865.

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Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIV – a quiet grief of final parting

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Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIV – a quiet grief of final parting

A liberal, “the conqueror” of the Jesuits and the founder of the Museo Pio-Clementino (presently a part of the Vatican Museums) died in 1774. Eight years later, one of his nepots assigned a later large sum to put up an appropriate monument for the pope in the Basilica of Santi XII Apostoli. Its author Antonio Canova created a work that was new in form and expression, which at the blink of an eye made him famous throughout Europe. Funerary art, starting at that very moment, changed its face, making Canova into an innovator, while at the same time the best continuator of the great Gi...

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