Commemorative monuments

Commemorative monuments

The Column of Marcus Aurelius – a souvenir of a wise, sensible and brave emperor

Commemorative monuments

Column of the Immaculate Conception – an antidote for heresies and mistakes of contemporary times

Commemorative monuments

Arch of Janus – mysterious structure with four façades

Commemorative monuments

The Arch of the Silversmiths – a place of memory erased

Commemorative monuments

Arch of Constantine – an ancient example of artistic recycling

Commemorative monuments

The Triumphant Arch of Emperor Titus – a commemoration of triumph and defeat engraved in stone

Commemorative monuments

Arch of Septimius Severus – a symbol of Roman expansion and dynastic ambitions

Commemorative monuments

Mausoleum of Empress Helena – meaning how to reconcile Christianity with the cult of the emperor

Commemorative monuments

Mausoleum on Janiculum Hill (Mausoleo Ossario Garibaldino) – the struggle for national heritage

Commemorative monuments

Antinous Obelisk (Pinciano) – pilgrimages of an obelisk of „sinful” provenance

Commemorative monuments

Flaminio Obelisk – a war trophy; the pride of the city, emperor and the pope

Commemorative monuments

Obelisk Macuteo – divine support for the emperor, the pope and the Roman populace

Commemorative monuments

Minerveo Obelisk, meaning the triumph of an elephant over Dominican dogs

Commemorative monuments

The Mussolini Obelisk – a monument of national amnesia

Commemorative monuments

Vaticano Obelisk – a granite witness to history

Commemorative monuments

The Statue of Giordano Bruno, meaning the ”black ship of Satan” among flowers, grapes and lettuce

Commemorative monuments

Statue of Giuseppe Mazzini – the delayed work of belle époque

Commemorative monuments

Funerary monument of Maria Clementina Sobieska – the joyful smile of a miserable queen

Commemorative monuments

The funerary monument of Pope Alexander VII, meaning the triumph of virtue over death

Commemorative monuments

Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIII – death appeased with beauty

Commemorative monuments

Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIV – a quiet grief of final parting

Commemorative monuments

Funerary Monument of Pope Leo XI – a modest and politically convincing work

Commemorative monuments

Funerary Monument of the Stuarts – death beautiful until perdition

Giovanni Baglioni’s Heavenly Love and Earthly Love – a virtue in the struggle against sin

News
News

Giovanni Baglioni’s Heavenly Love and Earthly Love – a virtue in the struggle against sin

These were the best of times when art was talked about without end. Times when the composition, color scheme, but especially the mysterious, ambiguous message of a painting was something to get excited about. A painting became an object of intellectual disputes and a true stimulus for spiritual pleasures. This was noticed by art patrons and collectors from the beginning of the Seicento period – a time of increased interest in works dedicated to private contemplation.  And they had a lot to choose from since at that time Rome became home to thousands of artists coming into the city f...

See more

Artemisia Gentileschi’s Saint Cecilia Playing the Lute – an autoportrait in the guise of a saint

News
News

Artemisia Gentileschi’s Saint Cecilia Playing the Lute – an autoportrait in the guise of a saint

A young woman in a beautiful dress is playing the lute, looking up, as if she was searching for inspiration. She could be one of the courtiers at the duke’s court making the time more enjoyable for both residents and guests, and if it had not been for the title of the painting we would not have thought that it depicts a saint. The artwork was painted by Artemisia Gentileschi “the only woman in Italy”, who had ever known what painting, color, impasto, and similar things mean”. This is what was claimed by the great expert of Baroque art, Roberto Longhi in his essay from 1...

See more

Gerrit (Gerard) van Honthorst (1590–1656) – a restrained nocturnal painter

News
News

Gerrit (Gerard) van Honthorst (1590–1656) – a restrained nocturnal painter

The turn of the XVI and XVII centuries in the Netherlands was a period of social unrest and religious struggles. In Utrecht, ruled by the Protestant, yet liberal elite, the artist was part of the Catholic minority. He learned his trade at the workshop of the famous Abraham Bloemaert. From among the forty-eight painters active in Utrecht at that time, twenty-five went to Italy. Van Honthorst did likewise. During several years he obtained valuable commissions for large-format works designated for churches and captured the minds and hearts of private collectors. His rapid career was a shock, even...

See more