Commemorative monuments

Commemorative monuments

The Column of Marcus Aurelius – a souvenir of a wise, sensible and brave emperor

Commemorative monuments

Column of the Immaculate Conception – an antidote for heresies and mistakes of contemporary times

Commemorative monuments

Arch of Janus – mysterious structure with four façades

Commemorative monuments

The Arch of the Silversmiths – a place of memory erased

Commemorative monuments

Arch of Constantine – an ancient example of artistic recycling

Commemorative monuments

The Triumphant Arch of Emperor Titus – a commemoration of triumph and defeat engraved in stone

Commemorative monuments

Arch of Septimius Severus – a symbol of Roman expansion and dynastic ambitions

Commemorative monuments

Mausoleum of Empress Helena – meaning how to reconcile Christianity with the cult of the emperor

Commemorative monuments

Mausoleum on Janiculum Hill (Mausoleo Ossario Garibaldino) – the struggle for national heritage

Commemorative monuments

Antinous Obelisk (Pinciano) – pilgrimages of an obelisk of „sinful” provenance

Commemorative monuments

Flaminio Obelisk – a war trophy; the pride of the city, emperor and the pope

Commemorative monuments

Obelisk Macuteo – divine support for the emperor, the pope and the Roman populace

Commemorative monuments

Minerveo Obelisk, meaning the triumph of an elephant over Dominican dogs

Commemorative monuments

The Mussolini Obelisk – a monument of national amnesia

Commemorative monuments

Vaticano Obelisk – a granite witness to history

Commemorative monuments

The Statue of Giordano Bruno, meaning the ”black ship of Satan” among flowers, grapes and lettuce

Commemorative monuments

Statue of Giuseppe Mazzini – the delayed work of belle époque

Commemorative monuments

Funerary monument of Maria Clementina Sobieska – the joyful smile of a miserable queen

Commemorative monuments

The funerary monument of Pope Alexander VII, meaning the triumph of virtue over death

Commemorative monuments

Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIII – death appeased with beauty

Commemorative monuments

Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIV – a quiet grief of final parting

Commemorative monuments

Funerary Monument of Pope Leo XI – a modest and politically convincing work

Commemorative monuments

Funerary Monument of the Stuarts – death beautiful until perdition

Emperor Maxentius (278–312) – an oppressor or a victim of a black legend?

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Emperor Maxentius (278–312) – an oppressor or a victim of a black legend?

All of those who are interested in Rome, predominantly connect his name with the famous Battle of the Milvian Bridge, in which he lost his life. The fact that he was the rival of Constantine, would for centuries – cloud the perception of his persona. And while his rival, known as Constantine the Great, has become the most important emperor for the Roman Catholic Church, he himself was condemned to damnatio memoriae, acquiring the status of the embodiment of an evildoer. Let us take a look at the propaganda mechanism, which has since the dawn of time accompanied authority and to which Max...

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The Hall of Constantine (Stanza di Constantino) – a hymn praising the papacy

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The Hall of Constantine (Stanza di Constantino) – a hymn praising the papacy

Stanza di Constantino is the last of the four apartments in the Apostolic Palace, which was decorated by the ingenious Raphael. Its decoration commissioned by Poe Leo X was finished during the pontificate of his successor, Clement VII. As we can imagine it was to immortalize the great Emperor Constantine – the first Christian ruler, however upon closer inspection, we must ask ourselves, who is the person glorified on the magnificent frescoes found in the room?

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Tetrarchy – a utopia of an emperor sick and tired of ruling

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Tetrarchy – a utopia of an emperor sick and tired of ruling

The forty-year-old emperor Diocletian, who would be remembered as the founder of the enormous baths in Rome, took the throne in the year 284. For the previous fifty years, the empire had been in a state of chaos, which was further testified to by the continuous changes of emperors as a result of military revolts. It is enough to point out that between the assassination of Alexander Severus (235) and the beginning of the reign of Diocletian, five different emperors ruled in Rome. The crisis was further strengthened by the constant invasions of Franks, Alemanni, and Goths from the north and Pers...

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