Sculptors

Sculptors

Alessandro Algardi (1598–1654) – unappreciated master of the Baroque art

Sculptors

Andrea Sansovino (approx. 1467–1529) – the one who was able to bring the dead back to life

Sculptors

Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – praised by his contemporaries, disregarded by later generations

Sculptors

Antonio Raggi (1624–1686) – a second pair of hands for master Bernini

Sculptors

Bartolomeo Ammannati (1511–1592) – the beginnings of an outstanding career of a great Italian Mannerist

Sculptors

Camillo Rusconi (1658–1728) – a little known genius of the turn of the centuries

Sculptors

Cosimo Fancelli (1618–1688), a great, but second-tier master of the Roman Baroque

Sculptors

Domenico Guidi (1625–1701) – meaning Bernini in the French style

Sculptors

Ercole Ferrata (1610–1686) – an imitator of extraordinary talent

Sculptors

Francesco Cavallini (1640–1703) – a sculptor of garlands and swaying saints

Sculptors

Francesco Mochi (1580–1654) – ousted, forgotten, disconsolate

Sculptors

Giovanni (Gian) Lorenzo Bernini (1599–1680) – Impulsive, arrogant and ingenious favorite of the popes

Sculptors

Giovanni Battista Maini (1690–1752) – elegance of late Baroque

Sculptors

Giuliano Finelli (1602–1653) – a sculptor of lace, leaves and collars, but also more

Sculptors

Jacopo Sansovino (1486–1570) – unappreciated in Rome, famous in Venice

Sculptors

Michelangelo (1475–1564), a painter by force – divine, yet miserable

Sculptors

Pietro Bracci (1700–1773) – a master of elegance and theatrical gestures

Sculptors

Stefano Maderno (c. 1570–1636) – an artist famous for just one statue

Villa Aldobrandini – a place of respite over the city teeming with life

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Villa Aldobrandini – a place of respite over the city teeming with life

In the very heart of Rome, by or more appropriately over one of the busiest streets of the city, the via Nazionale, stretches an enchanted garden. Between the ponds and palms, there are sculptures and antique fountains. And when we take a seat upon one of the benches, a scent of blooming camellias, magnolias, and orange flowers will reach our nostrils, while our eyes will be filled with views of cypresses and stone pines. This, in the past suburban villa, we can admire today in a much-reduced form and only our imagination may tell us what the orchards, gardens, and parks that stretched here un...

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The Temple of Romulus on Forum Romanum – a great archeological mystery

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The Temple of Romulus on Forum Romanum – a great archeological mystery

On Forum Romanum at via Sacra, between the Basilica of Maxentius and the Church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, there stands one of those ancient buildings which has been preserved in almost its original form. The brick building in the shape of a cylinder still today arouses the interest of researchers who strive to figure out its use. Who was this Romulus to whom it was dedicated? Was he the miraculously taken to heaven founder of Rome, who battled the Sabines here? Or perhaps he was the son of Maxentius – a tragically deceased youth, whom his father wanted to deify? The legends intertwine w...

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The Fascist Youth Organization Building by Luigi Moretti – a new architecture for a new era

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The Fascist Youth Organization Building by Luigi Moretti – a new architecture for a new era

Architecture has always been an expression of the prestige and power of those who commissioned it. Frequently it was also a means of propaganda. During Fascist times it was to fulfill a utilitarian function, but also to create the new esthetics of the new state targeted at a new man. Slogans such as modernity and progress were willingly used. Architecture was to be their emanation – a vision of universal and absolute order and rigor. Let us take a look at the language it used.

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