Artists

Sculptors

Alessandro Algardi (1598–1654) – unappreciated master of the Baroque art

Painters

Andrea Pozzo (1642–1709) – a master of painting illusion

Sculptors

Andrea Sansovino (approx. 1467–1529) – the one who was able to bring the dead back to life

Painters

Annibale Carracci (1560–1609) – a straightforward recluse in the world of Roman splendor

Painters

Antiveduto Grammatica (1571–1626) – an expert on heads with an extraordinary name

Painters

Antoniazzo Romano (1430? – 1512?) – an outstanding imitator of great masters

Sculptors

Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – praised by his contemporaries, disregarded by later generations

Sculptors

Antonio Raggi (1624–1686) – a second pair of hands for master Bernini

Architects

Armando Brasini (1879–1965) – creator of a bombastically draped architecture

Painters

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1653) – an unwomanly painter, humiliated and forgotten for centuries

Painters

Baciccio (1639–1709) – the creator of heaven and hell on Earth

Sculptors

Camillo Rusconi (1658–1728) – a little known genius of the turn of the centuries

Painters

Caravaggio (1571–1610) - a subtle interpreter of the Bible and a common criminal

Architects

Carlo Maderno (1556–1629) – a sought-after, hard-working and talented architect

Painters

Carlo Maratti (Maratta) (1625–1713) – an outstanding portraitist and a father of an equally outstanding daughter

Architects

Carlo Rainaldi (1611–1691) – an architect with a love for music

Painters

Carlo Saraceni (1579–1620) – an artist somewhere between verismo and idealism

Sculptors

Cosimo Fancelli (1618–1688), a great, but second-tier master of the Roman Baroque

Painters

Domenichino (1581–1641), the Roman rise and Neapolitan fall of little Dominic

Architects

Domenico Fontana (1543–1607) – an exceptional architect of an entrepreneurial pope

Sculptors

Domenico Guidi (1625–1701) – meaning Bernini in the French style

Architects

Donato Bramante (1444 –1514) – a famous wrecker, who changed the face of Rome

Sculptors

Ercole Ferrata (1610–1686) – an imitator of extraordinary talent

Architects

Francesco Borromini (1599–1667) – a distrustful melancholic and an extravagant architect

Sculptors

Francesco Cavallini (1640–1703) – a sculptor of garlands and swaying saints

Sculptors

Francesco Mochi (1580–1654) – ousted, forgotten, disconsolate

Architects

Giacomo della Porta (1533–1602), an author of Roman fountains and the most famous façade in the history of art

Sculptors

Giovanni (Gian) Lorenzo Bernini (1599–1680) – Impulsive, arrogant and ingenious favorite of the popes

Sculptors

Giovanni Battista Maini (1690–1752) – elegance of late Baroque

Painters

Giovanni Lanfranco (1582–1647) – painter of the Church triumphant

Sculptors

Giuliano Finelli (1602–1653) – a sculptor of lace, leaves and collars, but also more

Painters

Giuseppe Cesari (1568–1640) – in the past popular, today a forgotten favorite of the popes

Painters

Guercino (1591–1666) – short career of the Pope’s chosen one in Rome

Painters

Guido Reni (1575–1642) – a gambler with subtle manners

Sculptors

Jacopo Sansovino (1486–1570) – unappreciated in Rome, famous in Venice

Architects

Luigi Moretti (1907–1973) – a rationalist, Fascist and postmodern architect

Architects

Marcello Piacentini (1881–1960) – praised and criticized creator of Fascist Rome

Painters

Melozzo da Forlì (1438–1494) – the one who introduced the delicate touch of Renaissance to Rome

Sculptors

Michelangelo (1475–1564), a painter by force – divine, yet miserable

Architects

Onorio Longhi (1568–1619) – a vagabond architect

Painters

Orazio Gentileschi (1563–1639) – an intimate realist prone to rowdiness

Sculptors

Pietro Bracci (1700–1773) – a master of elegance and theatrical gestures

Painters

Pietro da Cortona (1596–1669) – a virtuoso of glories, triumphs and apotheoses of all kinds

Painters

Pinturicchio (1454–1513) – a creator of a simple, filled with grace storylines

Painters

Raphael (1483–1520) – the prematurely deceased genius of the Renaissance

Sculptors

Stefano Maderno (c. 1570–1636) – an artist famous for just one statue

Painters

Trophime Bigot (1597–1650) – a mysterious master of candlelight

Raphael (1483–1520) – the prematurely deceased genius of the Renaissance

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Raphael (1483–1520) – the prematurely deceased genius of the Renaissance

He was adored by the rich and influential, while on the day of his death, he was mourned not only by Pope Leo X but also the whole artistic community. He was seen as a pleasant, gentle, kind, and sociable person, who on top of that was righteous and noble. As his biographer, Giorgio Vasari claimed, "Raphael passionately loved women and was always ready for their services. This was why he was constantly seeking bodily pleasures." These kept him away from his work and perhaps as the concerned Vasari suggested, were also the cause of his death.

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The Transfiguration – the most divine of all Raphael’s works

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The Transfiguration – the most divine of all Raphael’s works

He was viewed as a painting genius, while his painting as exceptional. His figures were beautiful, both in the physical as well as the spiritual dimension, compositions were clear, the color scheme perfect. However, Raphael's last work cannot be characterized in this way. The artist has no desire to emanate with harmony, just the opposite – he puts us in front of distinct emotions, faces twisted in a grimace, dramatic gestures, and shouts, which seem to come to the viewer from inside the painting.

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Bernini’s Habakkuk and the Angel, meaning the story of a mysterious journey into the lion’s den

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Bernini’s Habakkuk and the Angel, meaning the story of a mysterious journey into the lion’s den

We enter the chapel and immediately our eyes are drawn to a group of figures, which seems to blast open the niche in which it finds itself – an older man in a dynamic pose, who is held by an angel by his lock of hair. The lively gestures of their hands indicate that there is a conflict brewing. The angel seems to be ordering the man to do something, which he questions, pointing in a different direction. When we follow the angel’s finger, we begin to understand what he means. He is pointing to a figure of another man found in the opposite niche – but what is it that truly conn...

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