The wayward, hostile and sinful

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Alaric (370–411) – revenge of an underestimated ally, meaning a strike at the very heart of the Empire

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Attila (approx. 400–453) – divine whip and the nemesis of Rome, a figure between myth and reality

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Galileo (1564–1642) – the one who dared to ridicule the pope

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Genseric (approx. 390–477) – a Vandal, who brought Rome to its knees

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Giordano Bruno (1548–1600) – a long life after death of the martyr of defiant thought

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Liutprand of Cremona (920? – 972?) – a vicious, biased and partial chronicler

The wayward, hostile and sinful

Pietro Aretino (1492–1556) – the father of yellow journalism and literary pornography

The Mussolini Obelisk – a monument of national amnesia

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The Mussolini Obelisk – a monument of national amnesia

We cross to the other side of the Tiber river, where a snow-white obelisk with a noble form commemorates the leader and creator of the Fascist state – “the Iron Prefect”, and "the spiritual leader of Europe", as the then propaganda referred to him. Film chronicles provided information about each stage of the transport of the marble block from Carrara as it happened, showing the throngs of tired yet joyous Italians who took part in this memorable event. With the eyes of the whole nation upon it, a momentous act of glorification of Mussolini was taking place – "the provid...

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Daniele da Volterra (1509–1566) – sentenced to many years of ridicule

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Daniele da Volterra (1509–1566) – sentenced to many years of ridicule

This artist was remembered for work, which brought him neither fame nor acclaim. However, as a painter and a sculptor he left behind several outstanding works, which for two centuries attracted art enthusiasts from all over Europe. Today we see him only as an imitator of Michelangelo, but also as his violator. And although this opinion is slowly changing, we still cannot fully appreciate his works. Why? Simply because most of it was destroyed and irrecoverably lost.

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The Rospigliosi-Pallavicini Chapel – the posthumous chord of a great Roman dynasty

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The Rospigliosi-Pallavicini Chapel – the posthumous chord of a great Roman dynasty

Multi-colored marbles, gilded stuccos, and exquisite wall intarsias – this is the appearance of one of the chapels of the Church of San Francesco a Ripa. And although this church is mainly known for the masterpiece chiseled by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, we can be sure that the richness of the burial site of one of the greatest Roman families, the Rospigliosi-Pallavicini will also take away our breath. For centuries, the posthumous chapel was one of the principal methods of self-presenting a family in a public location – an integral part showing its significance and prestige. And this wa...

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