Artists

Sculptors

Alessandro Algardi (1598–1654) – unappreciated master of the Baroque art

Painters

Andrea Pozzo (1642–1709) – a master of painting illusion

Sculptors

Andrea Sansovino (approx. 1467–1529) – the one who was able to bring the dead back to life

Painters

Annibale Carracci (1560–1609) – a straightforward recluse in the world of Roman splendor

Painters

Antiveduto Grammatica (1571–1626) – an expert on heads with an extraordinary name

Painters

Antoniazzo Romano (1430? – 1512?) – an outstanding imitator of great masters

Sculptors

Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – praised by his contemporaries, disregarded by later generations

Sculptors

Antonio Raggi (1624–1686) – a second pair of hands for master Bernini

Architects

Armando Brasini (1879–1965) – creator of a bombastically draped architecture

Painters

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1653) – an unwomanly painter, humiliated and forgotten for centuries

Painters

Baciccio (1639–1709) – the creator of heaven and hell on Earth

Sculptors

Camillo Rusconi (1658–1728) – a little known genius of the turn of the centuries

Painters

Caravaggio (1571–1610) - a subtle interpreter of the Bible and a common criminal

Architects

Carlo Maderno (1556–1629) – a sought-after, hard-working and talented architect

Painters

Carlo Maratti (Maratta) (1625–1713) – an outstanding portraitist and a father of an equally outstanding daughter

Architects

Carlo Rainaldi (1611–1691) – an architect with a love for music

Painters

Carlo Saraceni (1579–1620) – an artist somewhere between verismo and idealism

Sculptors

Cosimo Fancelli (1618–1688), a great, but second-tier master of the Roman Baroque

Painters

Domenichino (1581–1641), the Roman rise and Neapolitan fall of little Dominic

Architects

Domenico Fontana (1543–1607) – an exceptional architect of an entrepreneurial pope

Sculptors

Domenico Guidi (1625–1701) – meaning Bernini in the French style

Architects

Donato Bramante (1444 –1514) – a famous wrecker, who changed the face of Rome

Sculptors

Ercole Ferrata (1610–1686) – an imitator of extraordinary talent

Architects

Francesco Borromini (1599–1667) – a distrustful melancholic and an extravagant architect

Sculptors

Francesco Cavallini (1640–1703) – a sculptor of garlands and swaying saints

Sculptors

Francesco Mochi (1580–1654) – ousted, forgotten, disconsolate

Architects

Giacomo della Porta (1533–1602), an author of Roman fountains and the most famous façade in the history of art

Sculptors

Giovanni (Gian) Lorenzo Bernini (1599–1680) – Impulsive, arrogant and ingenious favorite of the popes

Sculptors

Giovanni Battista Maini (1690–1752) – elegance of late Baroque

Painters

Giovanni Lanfranco (1582–1647) – painter of the Church triumphant

Sculptors

Giuliano Finelli (1602–1653) – a sculptor of lace, leaves and collars, but also more

Painters

Giuseppe Cesari (1568–1640) – in the past popular, today a forgotten favorite of the popes

Painters

Guercino (1591–1666) – short career of the Pope’s chosen one in Rome

Painters

Guido Reni (1575–1642) – a gambler with subtle manners

Sculptors

Jacopo Sansovino (1486–1570) – unappreciated in Rome, famous in Venice

Architects

Luigi Moretti (1907–1973) – a rationalist, Fascist and postmodern architect

Architects

Marcello Piacentini (1881–1960) – praised and criticized creator of Fascist Rome

Painters

Melozzo da Forlì (1438–1494) – the one who introduced the delicate touch of Renaissance to Rome

Sculptors

Michelangelo (1475–1564), a painter by force – divine, yet miserable

Architects

Onorio Longhi (1568–1619) – a vagabond architect

Painters

Orazio Gentileschi (1563–1639) – an intimate realist prone to rowdiness

Sculptors

Pietro Bracci (1700–1773) – a master of elegance and theatrical gestures

Painters

Pietro da Cortona (1596–1669) – a virtuoso of glories, triumphs and apotheoses of all kinds

Painters

Pinturicchio (1454–1513) – a creator of a simple, filled with grace storylines

Sculptors

Stefano Maderno (c. 1570–1636) – an artist famous for just one statue

Painters

Trophime Bigot (1597–1650) – a mysterious master of candlelight

Caravaggio’s The Crucifixion of St. Peter – a painting on the banality of evil

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Caravaggio’s The Crucifixion of St. Peter – a painting on the banality of evil

Peter – a humble fisherman from Bethsaida will soon be raised along with the cross to which he has been nailed. He looks on as if in disbelief upon one of the nails, with which his hand has been affixed to the cross. In a short while, the martyrdom of the most important of apostles shall begin, the one whom Christ called the Rock ("upon this Rock, I shall build my Church"). We can see this very rock in a scaled-down form – it is the stone in the foreground. However, it is not this stone that draws our attention, but rather the lonely, helpless man, who is far removed from the image...

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Church of Santa Maria in Cappella – the Middle Ages restored anew

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Church of Santa Maria in Cappella – the Middle Ages restored anew

When I saw the façade of this tiny church for the first time, with its picturesque bell tower (campanile), my intuition told me that in front of my very eyes there is a pearl of subtle beauty and unprecedented atmosphere from centuries long gone. At that time it was completely ruined, while its walls – supported by wooden beams – seemed as if they would fall apart at any moment. The damp, dark interior promised little. As years passed I returned numerous times to this lovely spot on the Trastevere, hoping that one day it would be restored to its proper glory. And so it has c...

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Funerary monument of Maria Clementina Sobieska – the joyful smile of a miserable queen

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Funerary monument of Maria Clementina Sobieska – the joyful smile of a miserable queen

It is one of three funerary monuments, which are located in the Vatican Basilica, which are dedicated to women. That is why, we must pose ourselves the question, what did Maria Clementina Sobieska do to deserve such recognition and find herself among such figures, as Matilda of Canossa or the Queen of Sweden Christina.

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