Artists

Sculptors

Alessandro Algardi (1598–1654) – unappreciated master of the Baroque art

Painters

Andrea Pozzo (1642–1709) – a master of painting illusion

Sculptors

Andrea Sansovino (approx. 1467–1529) – the one who was able to bring the dead back to life

Painters

Annibale Carracci (1560–1609) – a straightforward recluse in the world of Roman splendor

Painters

Antiveduto Grammatica (1571–1626) – an expert on heads with an extraordinary name

Painters

Antoniazzo Romano (1430? – 1512?) – an outstanding imitator of great masters

Sculptors

Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – praised by his contemporaries, disregarded by later generations

Sculptors

Antonio Raggi (1624–1686) – a second pair of hands for master Bernini

Architects

Armando Brasini (1879–1965) – creator of a bombastically draped architecture

Painters

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1653) – an unwomanly painter, humiliated and forgotten for centuries

Painters

Baciccio (1639–1709) – the creator of heaven and hell on Earth

Sculptors

Camillo Rusconi (1658–1728) – a little known genius of the turn of the centuries

Painters

Caravaggio (1571–1610) - a subtle interpreter of the Bible and a common criminal

Architects

Carlo Maderno (1556–1629) – a sought-after, hard-working and talented architect

Painters

Carlo Maratti (Maratta) (1625–1713) – an outstanding portraitist and a father of an equally outstanding daughter

Architects

Carlo Rainaldi (1611–1691) – an architect with a love for music

Painters

Carlo Saraceni (1579–1620) – an artist somewhere between verismo and idealism

Sculptors

Cosimo Fancelli (1618–1688), a great, but second-tier master of the Roman Baroque

Painters

Domenichino (1581–1641), the Roman rise and Neapolitan fall of little Dominic

Architects

Domenico Fontana (1543–1607) – an exceptional architect of an entrepreneurial pope

Sculptors

Domenico Guidi (1625–1701) – meaning Bernini in the French style

Architects

Donato Bramante (1444 –1514) – a famous wrecker, who changed the face of Rome

Sculptors

Ercole Ferrata (1610–1686) – an imitator of extraordinary talent

Architects

Francesco Borromini (1599–1667) – a distrustful melancholic and an extravagant architect

Sculptors

Francesco Cavallini (1640–1703) – a sculptor of garlands and swaying saints

Sculptors

Francesco Mochi (1580–1654) – ousted, forgotten, disconsolate

Architects

Giacomo della Porta (1533–1602), an author of Roman fountains and the most famous façade in the history of art

Sculptors

Giovanni (Gian) Lorenzo Bernini (1599–1680) – Impulsive, arrogant and ingenious favorite of the popes

Sculptors

Giovanni Battista Maini (1690–1752) – elegance of late Baroque

Painters

Giovanni Lanfranco (1582–1647) – painter of the Church triumphant

Sculptors

Giuliano Finelli (1602–1653) – a sculptor of lace, leaves and collars, but also more

Painters

Giuseppe Cesari (1568–1640) – in the past popular, today a forgotten favorite of the popes

Painters

Guercino (1591–1666) – short career of the Pope’s chosen one in Rome

Painters

Guido Reni (1575–1642) – a gambler with subtle manners

Sculptors

Jacopo Sansovino (1486–1570) – unappreciated in Rome, famous in Venice

Architects

Luigi Moretti (1907–1973) – a rationalist, Fascist and postmodern architect

Architects

Marcello Piacentini (1881–1960) – praised and criticized creator of Fascist Rome

Painters

Melozzo da Forlì (1438–1494) – the one who introduced the delicate touch of Renaissance to Rome

Sculptors

Michelangelo (1475–1564), a painter by force – divine, yet miserable

Architects

Onorio Longhi (1568–1619) – a vagabond architect

Painters

Orazio Gentileschi (1563–1639) – an intimate realist prone to rowdiness

Sculptors

Pietro Bracci (1700–1773) – a master of elegance and theatrical gestures

Painters

Pietro da Cortona (1596–1669) – a virtuoso of glories, triumphs and apotheoses of all kinds

Painters

Pinturicchio (1454–1513) – a creator of a simple, filled with grace storylines

Sculptors

Stefano Maderno (c. 1570–1636) – an artist famous for just one statue

Painters

Trophime Bigot (1597–1650) – a mysterious master of candlelight

The Deliverance of St. Peter– between reality and a vision

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The Deliverance of St. Peter– between reality and a vision

Here in front of our very eyes, a mysterious scene takes place, written down in the Gospel of St. Luke. We are in Jerusalem. Christ had been crucified a few years prior. The ruler of Judea, King Herod Agrippa I, had already for some time been wanting to appeal to the Jews and persecutes a sect of Christians (Jews believing in Christ). He orders one of Jesus’s companions – James to be executed and has Peter imprisoned. Why him? It seemed that Peter was the leader of the new religious movement. Locked in prison and guarded by four regiments (four soldiers in each) after the Passover...

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Fontana di Piazza Mastai – an old or a new fountain, here is the question

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Fontana di Piazza Mastai – an old or a new fountain, here is the question

Walking along the streets of Trastevere, if we sit weary from our trip, on one of the stony benches on the Mastai Square, our eyes will be faced with quite a challenge. Although, we can feel that the fancy fountain, which we have in front of us is not old, similarly to the square itself, it looks like a centuries-old structure in every inch. If this ignorance would make us feel uneasy, it is simply enough to read the inscription found on one of its walls. We can have no doubt – the fountain was not created until 1865.

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Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIV – a quiet grief of final parting

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Antonio Canova’s funerary monument of Pope Clement XIV – a quiet grief of final parting

A liberal, “the conqueror” of the Jesuits and the founder of the Museo Pio-Clementino (presently a part of the Vatican Museums) died in 1774. Eight years later, one of his nepots assigned a later large sum to put up an appropriate monument for the pope in the Basilica of Santi XII Apostoli. Its author Antonio Canova created a work that was new in form and expression, which at the blink of an eye made him famous throughout Europe. Funerary art, starting at that very moment, changed its face, making Canova into an innovator, while at the same time the best continuator of the great Gi...

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